The following study was published in 2010 regarding OPRA and ILP implants and prior to current ILP revisions. It’s an interesting read and worth taking the time. A Comparative Finite-Element Analysis of Bone Failure and Load Transfer of Osseointegrated Prostheses Fixations

US National Library of Medicine National  Institutes of Health:  Journal of Rehabilitation Research and Development 2009
Published Article: Mark  Pitkin, PhD  CHALLENGE OF LONGEVITY FOR DIRECT SKELETAL ATTACHMENT

Rickard Branemark quoted regarding OPRA implants early failures:
“There will still be risks associated with this technique. If there is an infection we had to remove the implants, and with it a part of the leg. ” National Geographic Story profiling 1999 OPRA Implant Patient Erik Ax

Dr Horst Aschoff regarding ILP’s implant/skin interface:
“Of course there is NO natural opening in percutaneous implants!!!!!!!  But we have to deal with what it is. You need a complete closure of the gap  between the outer margin of the skin and the distal end of the bone in order to have almost no or no inner lining, so there is no interaction between fat tissue and steel. What’s left is a gap between the steel and the bone, maybe sometimes a little granulation tissue can’t be avoided. I believe that an uprising infection into the intramedullar space is hindered by osseointegration which for my understanding means a three dimensinal ingrowth of the bone into the structured surface of the implant,. This leads to a huge interface beween bone and steel and consequently there is only very little relative movement between these two partners which prevents the occuring of a a connective tissue interface”. Amputee Implant Technology Nov 2012

Dr Roy Bloebaum in 2010 Video lecture profiling OI risks – obstacles with good feedback from Gordon Blunn, PhD & Dr Horst Aschoff
Click here to watch the video

2012 ILP CONFERENCE LECTURES (A MUST READ FOR UPDATED ILP/OSSEOINTEGRATION INFORMATION)
Click here to see

Why Does the FDA take Such Precautions?
About Implant Medicine (A good read)

Promising Infection Research

Stanmore is conducting research in the United Kingdom on a version of Osseointegration called Osseocutaneous Integration with the their Intraosseous Transcutaneous Amputation Prostheses or ITAP  (Click here to watch a ITAP video). ITAP researchers headed by Professor Gordon Blunn, PhD attempt to overcome the problems associated with infection by integrating dermal and epidermal tissues with the implant, creating a soft tissue seal around the implant; in an attempt to mimic the way deer antlers interface at their exit point. Stanmore’s second implant patient Mark O’Leary has been utilizing the ITAP system since 2008 and reports no issues with infection or otherwise and has a complete seal with no weeping at the implant to skin interface.